Books

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Glaucon
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Re: Books

Postby Glaucon » Tue Sep 27, 2011 4:33 am

Thanks, all, for the suggestions. It seems I may be confined to bed/home for a while, so I think a large order with Amazon is due.

Glaucon, you play chess?


I do, though I am not a star (though I'll give you a fair game of Kaissa, I guess). Looks interesting though.

That reminds me of another book I remember getting recommended. That (auto?) biography of Nash (of the Nash-equilibrium). They made a movie out of that, with that Australian guy (beautiful mind) which was a bit sappy, but ... I am guessing you have read this one. Worth it?
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Pelopidas
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Re: Books

Postby Pelopidas » Tue Sep 27, 2011 11:49 am

Nope, only seen the movie.

Get well soon.
iJudas

Re: Books

Postby iJudas » Tue Sep 27, 2011 2:24 pm

Has anyone read 'Dwarves' by Markus Heitz?

My eye keeps getting drawn to the cover every time I head into my local book shop and I am tempted to pick it up. I was just after opinion.....as it is not normally my cup of tea.
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Glaucon
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Re: Books

Postby Glaucon » Sun Oct 23, 2011 6:34 pm

Never read that one, sorry.

Another recommendation (yes... I have time on my hands, so I go through them fairly quickly):

Joe Abercrombie: the 'first law' trilogy. Starting with 'the blade itself'.

Very gritty. Pretty cynical in tone. Quite a lot of 'combat' in it (sometimes a bit too much for my taste) but that fighting is really well done, I must say.

Pretty fast paced, a good amount of dark humour. Almost no 'nice' characters. For example, one of the main characters is a cynical toothless, crippled and castrated torturer/inquisitor who does to others as was done unto himself, torture-wise, working for very unpleasant people. Yet... you develop a sympathy for him anyway.

Certainly recommended for those who like the 'grittiness' of the game of thrones books, story arches that don't branch off so much. Not heavy on 'nice people' and 'romance' though.
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Pelopidas
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Re: Books

Postby Pelopidas » Thu Oct 27, 2011 3:06 pm

Liked book 1, not so much book 2 and 3. He gets shallow, repetitive, predictable.

Reading Steve Jobs biography currently, cant complain, descent book, and couple books on IMF im pretty sure nobody is interested in.
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Glaucon
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Re: Books

Postby Glaucon » Thu Oct 27, 2011 4:18 pm

Oh, I liked the second book. Reading the third, and yes... it is getting a bit predicable, I agree. But I would still recommend them.

Been thinking about that Jobs one. I'll skip the IMF books, yes. :mrgreen:
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Pelopidas
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Re: Books

Postby Pelopidas » Fri Nov 04, 2011 12:55 pm

Love in the Time of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Hilda
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Re: Books

Postby Hilda » Fri Nov 04, 2011 1:08 pm

Pelopidas wrote:Love in the Time of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez


Oh yeah! Thought they made me read it at school when I was 13. I should definitely read it again.
Hilda
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Re: Books

Postby Hilda » Fri Nov 04, 2011 1:11 pm

"The anatomist" by Federico Andahazi.

A review

Federico Andahazi creates a brilliant and imaginative work of historical fiction which is more centered on the fiction than the history. We follow the career of anatomy professor Mateo Colombo, two women – a rich widow, founder of an abbey, Ines de Torremolinos, and Mona Sofia, the most beautiful and expensive courtesan in Venice. All this is overseen by an ever-present crow.

Andahazi builds his two-part moral and metaphysical tale within a constantly repeated analogy. Mateo Colombo (Columbus in English) shares the last name of the more famous Christopher Columbus. The two are not related, and Mateo was born nineteen years after Christopher died. But, it is Andahazi’s contention that Mateo’s “discovery,” was every bit as world-historic as Christopher’s. Mateo “discovered” the clitoris.

I enjoyed Andahazi’s novel a great deal. It was creative, imaginative, bawdy and funny and gripping. I wondered whether he would win Mona Sofia, or would he be burned at the stake before getting a chance to try his discovery on her. It’s a quick but delightful read.

One of the strongest appeals of the novel for me was the humor. I close these comments with some of my favorite passages:

Anatomists of the time used dead bodies (as we do today) to learn and research. However, the dominant theology of his time officially prohibited the use of bodies, regarding them as sacred. Like many laws, however, it was widely ignored in practice, as long and one did it somehow beneath the surface. Andahazi writes: Since the Papal Bull of Boniface VIII had forbidden the dissection of cadavers, obtaining corpses was a job fraught with danger. And yet, in those days, there was in Padua a sort of black market of the dead. Its most solvent member was a certain Giuliano Batista who, after a fashion, had come to put things in order in this free-for-all economy. During the time of the reckless Marco Antonio della Torre, the previous Professor of Anatomy, the students had been encouraged to open graves, rifle the hospital morgues, and even take down the condemned from their cautionary gibbets. In fact, their teacher barely prevented them from murdering those who walked the streets at night. Such was their zeal that they were even forced to take precautions against one another. Such was their necrophilia that the highest compliment to which a woman could aspire in their hands was "What a beautiful body," before they proceeded to cut her throat.
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Pelopidas
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Re: Books

Postby Pelopidas » Fri Nov 04, 2011 3:27 pm

Hilda wrote:
Pelopidas wrote:Love in the Time of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez


Oh yeah! Thought they made me read it at school when I was 13. I should definitely read it again.


Hum, had only read 100 years of Solitude, so i think it was time to get serious ith Marquez, i mean Dear God iv spent so much time on the Gorean books i wanna cry :lol:

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